Crystallized Candied Edible Flowers Recipe


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Candied Flowers

Candied Flowers

Candied Flowers


Recipe by Ellen Easton and Linda Stradley. Photos by Ellen Easton from her Victorian Tea Menu.

Crystallized Candied flowers make beautiful decorations for desserts and can last up to one year. Not only do they taste amazing, but they add an elegant, romantic, and delicious touch to virtually every dessert. This job takes a little patience, but the rewards are well worth it!

Be sure and read What's Cooking America's informative article on using Edible Flowers before making your crystallized Candied Edible Flowers.

Check out more of Ellen Easton's Tea Travels articles and recipes.

Learn about the History of English High Tea and more delicious Afternoon Tea Recipes.
 



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Crystallized Candied Edible Flowers Recipe:

Recipe Type: Candy, Edible Flowers
Yields: makes many
Prep time: 30 min


Ingredients:

Fresh Edible Flowers*
1 egg white, room temperature (use pasteurized eggs) or powdered egg whites or meringue powder
Superfine sugar**

* Learn all about Edible Flowers and how to choose edible flowers.

** Either purchased superfine sugar or made in a blender or food processor (just blend regular sugar until extra-fine)


Equipment:

Paper Towels to dry flowers
2 small shallow bowls
Small tweezers (optional)
Small fine-tipped paint brush
Wire rack covered with waxed paper


Preparation:

Cutting Flowers: If you're cutting your own flowers, cut them as close to the base of the flower as possible.

Washing Flowers: Carefully and gently wash (under slow running cool water) and completely dry the flowers or petals. Place washed flowers on paper towels to dry, gently blot the flowers if necessary to remove excess water.

Egg White Mixture: Beat the egg white in a small bowl until slightly foamy, if necessary add a few drops of water to make the white easy to spread. You want to completely break the albumen down so you don't get any jelly-like clumps on your flowers, just a smooth coat of white. If using powdered egg whites or meringue powder, in a small bowl, combine powdered egg whites or meringue powder with water, using the amounts shown on the containers.

Painting the Flowers: Holding a flower or petal in one hand (tweezers help here), dip a small paint brush into the egg white. With the other hand, gently paint each flower or petal individually with beaten the egg white. Start by coating the back-side of the petals, then turn over and coat the top-side of the petals. Cover the flower or petal completely, but not excessively.

When thoroughly coated with egg white, hold the flower or petal over the sugar dish and gently sprinkle with superfine sugar evenly all over on both sides. If the sugar is absorbed after a few minutes, sprinkle again. Gently shake off any excess sugar.

Drying the Flowers: Place the coated flowers or petals on wax paper on a wire rack to dry. Let dry at room temperature (this could take 12 to 36 hours).

Repeat process with the remaining flowers or petals.

To test for dryness, check the base of the bloom and the heart of the flower to make sure they have no moisture. Flowers are completely dry when stiff and brittle to the touch. To hasten drying, you may place the candied flowers in an oven with a pilot light overnight, or in an oven set at 150 degrees to 200 degrees F with the door ajar for a few hours.

Storing the Flowers: Store the flowers in layers, separated by tissue paper, in an airtight container at room temperature until ready to use. This crystallized/candied flowers can last up to one (1) year if properly stored.

 



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