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St. Patrick's Day - March 17th

You do not have to actually be Irish to join in the fun and celebration of St. Patrick's Day!
Just cook up some wonderful traditional Irish food for your family and friends.

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned Beef and Cabbage
My family and I look forward to enjoying corned beef and cabbage dinner as part of celebrating Saint Patrick’s Day every year. This is a great no-fuss meal to serve on Saint Patrick's Day or any day that you desire. We have also learned to fry up the leftovers for breakfast the next day to make the Corned Beef Bubble and Squeak recipe shown below.


Irish Colcannon Bubble and Squeak Irish Soda Bread Guinness Stew

Irish Colcannon Potatoes - Mashed Potato with Kale and Bacon
Colcannon is true Irish soul food. The dish consists of mashing together buttery mashed potatoes with cooked kale or cabbage and leeks for flavoring.

Corned Beef Bubble and Squeak
Bubble and Squeak is a traditional Monday lunch in England to take the leftover potatoes and vegetables from Sunday supper and fry it up to enjoy for lunch the next day with eggs, bacon, and/or any leftover meat.

Irish Soda Bread
Here is a wonderful traditional Irish Soda bread recipe that can be found in homes and markets all over Ireland. In the United States, Irish Soda bread is popular to accompany Corned Beef and Cabbage when celebrating Saint Patrick’s Day.

Guinness Beef Stew - Irish Beef Stew
Most every pub you visit in Ireland will offer Beef and Guinness Stew on the menu. Stewing the beef in Guinness stout beer tenderizes the beef and adds a robust, malty flavor to the stew.

 


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Great cooks use a Cooking Thermometer as their guide - NOT A Clock.

Always follow internal cooking temperatures to be safe!

Internal Temperature Cooking Charts - meat, poultry, seafood, breads, baked goods, and casseroles

Cooking and Meat ThermometerA cooking or meat thermometer should not be a "sometime thing." A cooking thermometer can be used for all foods, not just meat. It measures the internal temperature of your cooked meat, poultry, seafood, breads, baked goods, and/or casseroles to assure that a safe temperature has been reached and that harmful bacteria (like certain strains of Salmonella and E. Coli O 157:H7) have been destroyed. Learn how to read and use an Internal Meat and Cooking Thermometer.

Cooking thermometers take the guesswork out of cooking, as they measures the Internal Temperature of your cooked meat, poultry, seafood, baked goods, and/or casseroles, to assure that a safe temperature has been reached, harmful bacteria have been destroyed, and your food is cook perfectly.