History of Funeral Pie - Raisin Pie - Rosina Pie

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Funeral Pie is also known as Raisin Pie and Rosina Pie (German for raisin).

For many years raisin pie was served with the meal prepared for family and friends at the wake following a funeral. This pie traditionally is served at funerals of Old Order Mennonites and Amish. This pie became a favorite of Mennonite cooks because the ingredients were always available and the pie kept well. That meant it could be made a day or two before the funeral supper and freed hands for other tasks. The pie does not need refrigeration.

Some recipes include milk, making it more like a custard pie, and others include water, but they all seem to agree on the necessity of a double-crusted pie, usually with a lattice top.

 

 

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