Wet Bottom Shoofly Pie Recipe

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Amish Pie Recipe

 

The origin of the name Shoofly pie and Wet-Bottom Shoo Fly Pie has been debated for years and will probably never ultimately be solved.  The most logical explanation is related to the fact that during the early years of our country, all baking was done in big outdoor ovens.  The fact that pools of sweet, sticky molasses sometimes formed on the surface of the pie while it was cooling, invariably attracting flies, show how such a pie could come to be called Shoofly Pie.

Shoofly pie seems to be a variation of the older Treacle Tart. Treacle is the British generic name for any syrup made during the refining of sugar cane; i.e., Treacle, Black Treacle, Molasses, Golden Syrup, and Blackstrap are all treacles.  During the 17th century, treacle was used chiefly as a cheap from of sweetener.  By the late 1700s, refined sugar became affordable to the masses in Britain and overtook treacle as a general sweetener.  Molasses was often substituted for treacle in colonial American recipes.  Many early cookbooks have Molasses Pie recipes.

Enjoy this traditional Pennsylvania Dutch country treat that has been popular since the 1800’s.  We can thank the Amish settlers for the creation of this sweet treat.  The Amish usually eat Shoofly pie as a breakfast dish, like coffee cake or donuts.  It is also a must to enjoy with a big dollop of whipped cream on your slice of pie.

Check out more detailed history of Shoofly Pie and also out more great Pie Recipes.

 

Shoofly Pie

 

Shop What’s Cooking America – Easy on-line shopping for all your pie baking needs such as pie platespie crust shieldswire cooling rackspie serverspie cutters/slicerssilicone baking mats, plus Linda’s favorite Super-Fast Thermapen Thermometer.

 

Wet Bottom Shoofly Pie Recipe:

Wet Bottom Shoofly Pie Recipe

Prep Time: 25 minutes

Cook Time: 50 minutes

Yield: 8 servings

Ingredients:

Pastry for 9-inch one crust pie
3 tablespoon solid vegetable shortening or butter, room temperature
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2/3 cup firmly-packed brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup hot water
1 cup King Syrup or dark molasses*
egg

* Can substitute 1/2 cup dark molasses and 1/2 cup light or dark corn syrup.

 

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Prepare pie pastry.  Using a floured rolling pin, roll pastry 2 inches larger than an inverted pie plate.  Fold pastry into quarter folds and ease into pie plate, pressing firmly against bottom and side; set aside.

In a large bowl, using a pastry blender or two knives, cut shortening or butter into flour, brown sugar, and salt until mixture is crumble and particles are the size of small peas; set aside.

In a large bowl, add baking soda and hot water; stir until baking soda is dissolved.  Add molasses (or molasses and corn syrup combination) and egg; beat until well blended.  Pour into prepared unbaked pie shell, filling half full (you may not need to use all of the filling - if you overfill the shell, it will overflow during baking). Trim overhanging edge of pastry 1/2 inch from rim of plate.

Gently sprinkle prepared crumb mixture evenly over top of the pie (crumbs will both partly sink and partly float).

Bake 10 minutes and then reduce oven to 350 degrees F.  Bake an additional 35 to 40 minutes or until the internal temperature registers at least 160 degrees F. on your cooking thermometer and a knife inserted in center comes out clean

Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack before serving.  This pie is best served at room temperature.

Makes 8 servings.

 

https://whatscookingamerica.net/Desserts/ShooflyPie.htm

Sources:  Photo from the Dutch Kitchen restaurant in Frackville, PA. and the Yoder’s Deitsch Haus restaurant in Montezuma, GA.

 

Shoo Fly Pie

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