Wet-Bottom Shoofly Pie Recipe
How To Make Wet-Bottom Shoofly Pie - Amish Pie Recipe


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The origin of the name shoofly pie has been debated for years and will probably never ultimately be solved.

Shoofly Pie (Wet Bottom)
Photo from the Yoder’s Deitsch Haus restaurant in Montezuma, GA.

Shoofly Pie (Wet Bottom)
Photo from the Dutch Kitchen restaurant in Frackville, PA.

Check out the history of Shoofly Pie and also out more great Pie Recipes.
 


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Wet-Bottom Shoofly Pie Recipe:

Recipe Type: Pie, Pie Pastry, History, Molasses
Cuisine: Pennsylvania Dutch (Amish and Mennonites)
Yields: 8 servings
Prep time: 25 min
Cook time: 50 min


Ingredients:

Pastry for 9-inch one crust pie
3 tablespoon solid vegetable shortening or butter, room temperature
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2/3 cup firmly-packed brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup hot water
1 cup dark molasses*
1 egg

* Can substitute 1/2 cup dark molasses and 1/2 cup light or dark corn syrup.


Preparation:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Prepare pie pastry. Using a floured rolling pin, roll pastry 2 inches larger than an inverted pie plate. Fold pastry into quarter folds and ease into pie plate, pressing firmly against bottom and side; set aside.

In a large bowl, using a pastry blender or two knives, cut shortening or butter into flour, brown sugar, and salt until mixture is crumble and particles are the size of small peas; set aside.

In a large bowl, add baking soda and hot water; stir until baking soda is dissolved. Add molasses (or molasses and corn syrup combination) and egg; beat until well blended. Pour into prepared unbaked pie shell, filling half full (you may not need to use all of the filling - if you overfill the shell, it will overflow during baking). Trim overhanging edge of pastry 1/2 inch from rim of plate.

Gently sprinkle prepared crumb mixture evenly over top of the pie (crumbs will both partly sink and partly float).

Bake 10 minutes and then reduce oven to 350 degrees F. Bake an additional 35 to 40 minutes or until the internal temperature registers at least 160 degrees F. on your cooking thermometer and a knife inserted in center comes out clean

This is the type of cooking thermometer that I prefer and use in my cooking. I get many readers asking what cooking thermometer that I prefer and use in my cooking and baking. I, personally, use the Thermapen Thermometer shown in the photo on the right. Originally designed for professional users, the Super-Fast Thermapen Thermometer is used by chefs all over the world.

Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack before serving. This pie is best served at room temperature.

Makes 8 servings.

 




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