Baking Dish and Pan Size Conversions

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Baking Dishes and Pans    Cooking Lessons - Cooking 101   

 

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How To Measure Pan Sizes:

 

Measure Dimensions:  To determine the pan’s dimensions always measure inside edge to inside edge of the pan so that you do not include the thickness of the pan in your measurement.

 

Measure Depth:  To measure the depth, place your ruler straight up from the bottom of the pan (do not slant the ruler).  If the pan edge is slanted, do not slant the ruler, measure straight up.

 

Pan Volume:  To determine the pan’s volume (how much batter it will hold), pour premeasured water by the cupful until the pan is filled to the brim.  Use a liquid measuring cup to pour water into the pan until it reaches the top.

If the new pan makes the batter shallower than in the original recipe, this will cause the heat to reach the center of the pan more quickly and you will have more evaporation.  To solve this problem you need to shorten the baking time and raise the temperature of the oven slightly.  To substitute a pan that is shallower than the pan in the recipe, reduce the baking time by 1/4.

If the new pan makes the batter deeper than in the original recipe, this will cause less evaporation and the batter will take longer to cook.  To solve this problem you need to lengthen the baking time and lower the temperature of the oven slightly.  To substitute a pan that is deeper than the pan in the recipe, increase the baking time by 1/4.

 

How To Substitute Pans:

 

The following table will help determine substitutions of pans and dishes of similar approximate size if you do not have the specific sized baking pan, dish, or mold called for in a recipe.

To substitute with glass pans, reduce the baking temperature by 25 degrees.

 

Pan SizePan Substitution
3-cup Baking Dish or Pan:8" x 1-1/4 round pan
4-cup Baking Dish or Pan:1 (8") round cake pan
7-1/2" x 3" bundt tube pan
8" x 8" x 2" square pan
8 1/2" x 4-1/2" x 2-1/2" loaf pan
9" x 1-1/2" round layer cake pan
9" x 2" round pie plate (deep dish)
9" x 9" x 1-1/2" rectangular pan
10" x 1-1/2" round pie plate
11" x 7" x 2" rectangular pan
7-cup Baking dish or Pan:8" x 2" round cake pan
9" x 9" x 2" rectangular pan
8-cup Baking dish or Pan:8" x 8" x 2" square pan
9" x 2" round cake pan
9" x 5" x 3" loaf pan
9" x 9" x 1-1/2" square pan
9-1/4" x 2-3/4" ring mold
9-1/2" x 3-1/4" brioche pan
11" x 7" x 1-1/2" baking pan
9-cup Baking Dish or Pan:8" x 3" bundt pan
9" x 3" tube pan
10-cup Baking Dish or Pan:8" x 2-1/2" springform pan
9" x 9" x 2" square pan
11-3/4" x 7-1/2" x 1 3/4" baking pan
13" x 9" x 2" rectangular pan
15-1/2" x 10-1/2" x 1" jelly-roll pan
11-cup Baking Dish or Pan:
9" x 3" springform pan
10" x 2" round cake pan
12-cup Baking Dish or Pan:2 (9") round cake pans
9" x 3" angel-cake pan or tube pan
10" x 2-1/2" springform pan
10" x 3-1/2" bundt pan
13" x 9" x 2" metal baking pan
14" x 10-1/2" x 2-1/2" roasting pan
15-cup Baking dish or Pan:13" x 9" x 2" rectangular pan
16-cup Baking dish or Pan:
9" x 3-1/2" springform pan
10" x 4" fancy tube mold
18-cup Baking dish or Pan:10" x 4" angel-cake or tube pan

Comments and Reviews

One Response to “Baking Dish and Pan Size Conversions”

  1. carol

    So, if I wanted to halve a 9 x 13 lasagna pan, I would make one full recipe and put 1/2 into a 9 x9 square pan? thank you!

    Reply

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