Holiday Brisket Roast Recipe

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Holiday Brisket Roast Recipe

Oven and Instant Pot Pressure Cooker Instructions

Ellen Easton shares her recipe for a traditional holiday brisket roast that is a favorite to serve for Passover or any special occasion.  The brisket is slowly oven roasted on low heat resulting in a tender meat that melts in your mouth.  The flavor of the holiday brisket roast from Ellen’s recipe is slightly sweet with a nice tang from the tomato-based sauce and the dried fruit. Instructions have also been provided to cook in the Instant Pot Pressure Cooker if you are looking for a time saving option.

Find more Passover recipe ideas in Ellen’s Passover Dinner Menu.

 

Holiday Brisket Roast Dinner

Recipe and Photos by Ellen Easton ©All Rights Reserved
Brisket Guidelines and Tips by What’s Cooking America ©All Rights Reserved

 

Eastern European Jews could not afford expensive cuts of meat, so they would typically purchase the less expensive brisket which was a tougher cut of meat. Over the years, they learned the secret to a tender brisket was to cook the meat “low and slow”, meaning lower oven temperatures for a longer period of time. Brisket has become a favorite main dish served at most Jewish holiday meals.

Check out more of Ellen Easton’s Tea Travels™ articles and recipes.

Learn how to make Smoked Brisket.

 

Quick LInks:
Essential Kitchen Equipment
Preparing Brisket
Brisket Internal Temperature
How to Slice and Serve Brisket
Holiday Brisket Roast Recipe
Instant Pot Pressure Cooker Directions

 

 

 

Brisket diagram Types of Brisket:

Two different cuts of brisket are available.  Unless the recipe specifies one or the other, either may be used in recipes calling for boneless beef brisket:

Beef Brisket Flat Half (also known as thin cut, flat cut, first cut, or center cut):  With its minimal fat, this cut is generally the pricier of the two.

Beef Brisket Point Half (also known as front cut, point cut, thick cut, or nose cut):  A less expensive of the two.  With more fat, and more flavor.

Brisket image from AggieMeat

 

Purchasing Brisket:

Look for a piece of brisket that is dark red in color, feels tender, and springs back to the touch.  It is not recommended to use brisket that has been frozen as the the meat will not turn out tender when cooked.  If the brisket feels stiff or flops over, then it’s a good indicator that it was previously frozen – do not purchase.

Look for a brisket that has a good layer of fat at the tip of the brisket (this is called the fat cap) and you also want to see that the fat is marbled throughout the entire cut of brisket.  Look for a brisket that is laced with fat all over, as it will cook to fall-apart tender, which is the result that you want to achieve.  The fat should appear bright white in color.  If it has a yellowish appearance, then it’s not a fresh cut of meat.

Most briskets found at the store are between 3 1/2 to 6 pounds.  Calculate about 3 to 4 ounces of meat per person.

 

Essential Kitchen Equipment:

Roasting pan
Food processor or Blender
Mixing bowls
Rubber spatula
Glass or Ceramic Baking Dish
Cutting board with well
Carving knive



Preparing Brisket:

Most brisket will have a layer of fat on the top.  This is known as the fat cap and provides the flavor in the brisket.  You want to leave most of the fat on.  Use a sharp knife to trim away any excess fat to an even layer of about 1/4 inch.

The brisket can be sliced into smaller chunks if needed to fit into smaller roasting pans.  Let the brisket come to room temperature before placing in the oven to roast.

 

Brisket Internal Temperature:

About 45 minutes before the estimated end of the roasting (bake) time, begin checking the internal temperature (use a good instant-read digital meat thermometer).  Play it safe and start checking early, as you do not want anything to go wrong.  This is even more important if you are adjusting for High Altitude Baking.

If you ignore every other bit of advice I have given, please pay attention to this:  For a perfectly fall-apart tender cooked brisket, invest in a good meat thermometer.   Internal temperature, not time, is the best test for doneness.

Thermapen Internal Temperature Cooking ChartThis is the type of cooking and meat thermometer that I prefer and use in my cooking.  I get many readers asking what cooking/meat thermometer that I prefer and use in my cooking and baking.  I, personally, use the Thermapen Thermometer shown in the photo on the right.  To learn more about this excellent thermometer and to also purchase one (if you desire), just click on the underlined:  Thermapen Thermometer.

When checking the temperature of your brisket, insert meat thermometer so tip is in thickest part of beef, not resting in fat.  It is not until the brisket reaches an internal temperature of 200 degrees F. and maintains that temperature for at least an hour  during roasting that the collagen can break down for the meat to become tender.  Remove brisket from oven, cover loosely with aluminum foil, and let sit at least 30 minutes to 1 hour.  Cutting into the meat too early will cause a significant loss of juice. Do not skip the resting stage.

 

How to Slice and Serve Brisket:

Place the cooked brisket on a large Meat Cutting Board with a well at one end to hold the juice.  Let the brisket rest for at least 30 minutes to retain the juices longer before slicing.

Using a sharp carving knife, slice/carve brisket against the grain.  Working from the thin, square end of the brisket, cut long thin slices about the thickness of a pencil.  If the brisket is a little tough, cut it thinner.  If the brisket starts to fall apart cut the slices thicker.  As you work your way along, trim off any large pieces of fat and discard.

If serving the cooking juices alongside your brisket,  use a large spoon to skim and discard any excess fat from the juices in the roasting pan.  Using a heavy spoon, scrape all the dark drippings and any crunchy bits from the sides and bottom of roasting pan.  Pour the extra juices and fixings into a saucepan reheat until sauce is hot (but not boiling).  Pour the sauce over the top of the brisket right before serving.

 

 

Ellen Easton’s Holiday Brisket Roast Recipe:

Recipe and Photos by Ellen Easton ©All Rights Reserved

Holiday Brisket Roast Recipe

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 5 hours

Yield: Serves 6

Instant Pot Pressure Cooker Time: 2 hours

Ingredients:

5 pound first center cut brisket
1 lemon
1 to 2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
Reva Paul’s seasoning mix*
1 sweet onion, (1/4 onion sliced, remaining chopped)
3 garlic gloves, peeled and minced
1 medium shallot, minced
1 (6 ounce) can tomato paste
1 (7.4 counce) can tomato sauce
1 cup Ketchup
1 cup Heinz Chili Sauce
1 cup baby carrots (or large sliced carrots)
1 cup pitted prunes
2 tablespoons Domino Brownulated** or Dark Brown Sugar
1 cup water

*Reva Paul's Seasoning Mix:
2-1⁄2 tablespoons onion powder 
2-1⁄2 tablespoons garlic powder 
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pepper

Place all ingredients in a bowl and mix together.  Store in a container, preferably with a dual shaker / open, easy to spoon out top.  Store in a cool, dry place until ready to use.

Brownulated Sugar **Brownulated Sugar: Brownulated sugar is sweeter than regular brown sugar since it absorbs more moisture while cooking.  This is due to it's lighter, dry texture.  The particles are loose and do not clump like regular brown sugar

 

 

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Place brisket fat side down in roasting pan.  Note: this will allow the sauce to penetrate into the meat better during roasting.  If fat side is up, the sauce will not penetrate as well.  Place the ingredients on the brisket in the following order: Squeeze the juice of one lemon, sprinkle ground cinnamon, and then sprinkle Reva Paul's seasoning mix.

In a blender or food processor add the onion, garlic and shallot and 1/4-1/3 cup of water and blend together until a paste-like consistency forms.  Spread the onion paste mixture across the top of the brisket.

For the next step, in a small bowl, combine tomato paste, tomato sauce, ketchup, and Heinz chili sauce, then generously pour over the top of the brisket.

Add reserved sliced onions and 1/2 the pitted prunes on top of the brisket.  Place sliced or baby carrots and remaining prunes on the sides of the pan.  Sprinkled the top with Domino Brownulated sugar or dark brown sugar.  Pour water in the bottom of the pan, cover with aluminum foil and bake in the oven at 325 degrees Fahrenheit for one hour.

Holiday Brisket Roast - prepped and ready to cook

After one hour poke holes in the foil and continue cooking for four more hours or brisket reaches an internal temperature of 200 degrees F and maintains that temperature for at least one full hour (the meat should be fall apart tender).

Remove from the oven and allow the brisket to rest for thirty minutes to one hour before slicing.  Slice against the grain.  Save the extra juices and fixings from the pan in a jar to reheat in a pan until sauce is hot but not boiling.  Pour the sauce over the top of the brisket right before serving.

Tip:  This holiday brisket recipe is best if made the day before, then covered and refrigerated overnight as this will improve the flavors.  You can also freeze the brisket for up to one week before reheating. 

To Reheat:  Let the brisket return to room temperature.  Skim off any solid fat bits from the top of the sauce and discard.  Place the whole or sliced brisket on a cutting board and slice against the grain.  Next, place the sliced brisket in a glass baking pan and pour the juices and fixings over the brisket (make sure to also pour sauce between each slice).  Cover with aluminum foil and poke holes with a fork to allow for ventilation.  Reheat in a slow 250 degree F. oven for 45 minutes to 1 hour until brisket is heated through.

Serves 6.

Accompaniments: Baked Applesauce, Savory Kugel Noodle Pudding, Potato Pancakes and Peas

 

 

Instant Pot Pressure Cooker Directions:

Instructions and Photo by What's Cooking America ©All Rights Reserved

 

Holiday Brisket Roast in Instant Pot Pressure Cooker

Pour 1 cup of water into the inner pot.

Place brisket fat side down on a platter.  Note: this will allow the sauce to penetrate into the meat better during roasting.  If fat side is up, the sauce will not penetrate as well. (If needed, cut the brisket into 2 to 3 chunks to fit inside the pressure cooker pot before you start the prep work).  Place the ingredients on the brisket in the following order: Squeeze the juice of one lemon, sprinkle ground cinnamon, and then sprinkle Reva Paul's seasoning mix.

In a blender or food processor add the onion, garlic and shallot and 1/4-1/3 cup of water and blend together until a paste-like consistency forms.  Spread the onion paste mixture across the top of the brisket.  Stack the brisket pieces with seasonings and onion paste layers inside the inner pot.

For the next step, in a small bowl, combine tomato paste, tomato sauce, ketchup, and Heinz chili sauce, then pour over the top of the brisket pieces.  Lift the pieces as needed to cover each chunk with the tomato sauce mixture.  Sprinkle brown sugar on top of the sauce on each chunk of brisket.

Add reserved sliced onions and 1/2 the pitted prunes on top of the brisket.  Cover with lid and close to seal.  Make sure the pressure valve is also closed to seal.  Press the Manual button and set to high pressure.  Adjust the cooking time to 70 minutes. When the cooking time has completed, allow for a Natural Pressure Release until the pressure pin drops.  Open and remove the lid.  Add carrots (you can also add in other roots vegetable chunks as desired such as potatoes and parsnips) around the chunks of meat and cover with some sauce.  Cover with the lid and seal to close.  Make sure the pressure valve is closed to seal.  Press the Manual button and set to high pressure.  Adjust the cooking time to 10 minutes.  When the cooking time has completed, Quick Release the pressure.

Remove the brisket meat from the Instant Pot and place on cutting board.  Use a long carving knife to slice the brisket against the grain.  Arrange the sliced brisket on a platter and spoon the tomato sauce from the pot over each slice of brisket.  Use a slotted spoon to scoop out the cooked vegetables and prunes and arrange around the brisket.

Tip: This holiday brisket recipe is best if made the day before, then covered and refrigerated overnight as this will improve the flavors.  You can also freeze the brisket for up to one week before reheating.

To Reheat:  Let the brisket return to room temperature.  Skim off any solid fat bits from the top of the sauce and discard.  Add 1 cup of water to the bottom of the inner pot.  Place the whole or sliced brisket on a cutting board and slice against the grain.  Next, place the sliced brisket in the inner pot and pour the left over tomato sauce and fixings over the brisket (make sure to also pour sauce between each slice).  Cover with lid and close the lid to seal.  Make sure the pressure valve is also closed to seal.  Press the Steam button and set the time for 5 minutes.  Quick Release the pressure and open the lid.  Check the brisket to see if heated all the way through.  If more time is needed then close the lid and pressure valve and steam for 2 to 3 more minutes and check the brisket again.

Serves 6.

 

https://whatscookingamerica.net/elleneaston/holidaybrisketroast.htm


Holiday Brisket RoastTEA TRAVELS™ – Wishing You Happy TEA TRAVELS!™  Tea is the luxury everyone can afford!™ and Good $ense for $uccess are the trademarked property of Ellen Easton/ RED WAGON PRESS

Ellen Easton, author of Afternoon Tea~Tips, Terms and Traditions (RED WAGON PRESS), a lifestyle and etiquette industry leader, keynote speaker and product spokesperson, is a hospitality, design, and retail consultant whose clients have included The Waldorf=Astoria, Plaza Hotels, and Bergdorf Goodman.  Easton’s family traces their tea roots to the early 1800s, when ancestors first introduced tea plants from India and China to the Colony of Ceylon, thus building one of the largest and best cultivated tea estates on the island.


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